Oberon class (Diesel-electric hunter-killer) HMS Dreadnought (S101) Valiant class attack submarines Resolution class ballistic missile submarines Churchill class attack submarines Swiftsure class attack submarines Trafalgar They were designed as a direct follow-on from the Porpoise-class: physical dimensions were the same, but stronger materials were used in hull construction, and updated equipment was fitted. The submarines were built between 1957 and 1978 by four shipyards: Cammel Laird (4), Chatham Dockyard (6), Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Company (11) and Vickers-Armstrongs (6). Oberon-class submarines Category page Edit Classic editor History Talk (0) The main article for this category is Oberon-class submarine. The Oberons operated during the height of the Cold War, with duties including surveillance, tracking of other ships and submarines, delivery and retrieval of special forces personnel, and serving as targets for anti-submarine training. Changes from the Porpoise design were primarily to improve the strength and stealth of the submarine. As of 2015, eight of the submarines are preserved intact as museum vessels, another three are partially preserved (with some exterior portions of the submarine on display), and one is in private ownership and awaiting conversion for display. As of 2015, eight of the submarines are preserved intact as museum vessels, another three are partially preserved (with some exterior portions of the submarine on display), and one is in private ownership and awaiting conversion for display.

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Category:Oberon class submarines. Fin and upper casing preserved at, Preserved at the Navy Cultural Centre, Rio de Janeiro, Originally laid down for the Royal Navy as, This page was last edited on 28 February 2020, at 18:43. They were designed as a direct follow-on from the Porpoise-class: physical dimensions were the same, but stronger materials were used in hull construction, and updated equipment was fitted.

In the Royal Australian Navy, pennant numbers are normally rendered with a space between the letters and numbers, and use an expanded identifier similar to the United States Navy's, Company formed following the 1967 merger of Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Company and, Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Site historique maritime de la Pointe-au-Père, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_Oberon-class_submarines&oldid=943082979, Wikipedia articles needing page number citations from June 2015, Short description is different from Wikidata, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, Operated by Canada from 1989 to the 1990s as a non-commissioned, Between 1988 and 1991, used by Canada as a, Sold for scrap in 1995. [1], The submarines were built between 1957 and 1978 by four shipyards: Cammell Laird (4), Chatham Dockyard (6), Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Company (11) and Vickers-Armstrongs (6). The Oberons operated during the height of the Cold War, with duties including surveillance, tracking of other ships and submarines, delivery and retrieval of special forces personnel, and serving as targets for anti-submarine training.

The 295.2 feet (90.0 m) long Oberon class was based heavily on the preceding Porpoise class of submarines, which were in service from 1956 to 1988.

Submarines of the class were in service until 2000. The Oberon-class submarines, which were almost identical to the Porpoises, and the first of which was commissioned in 1961, survived their predecessor only a little longer, all …

In the Royal Australian Navy, pennant numbers are normally rendered with a space between the letters and numbers, and use an expanded identifier similar to the United States Navy's, Company formed following the 1967 merger of Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Company and Lithgows, Reserve Officers' Training Corps (Philippines), People of the American Civil War by state, Articles needing page number citations from June 2015, Articles incorporating text from Wikipedia, Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Site historique maritime de la Pointe-au-Père, https://military.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_Oberon-class_submarines?oldid=2333972, Operated by Canada from 1989 to the 1990s as a non-commissioned, Between 1988 and 1991, used by Canada as a, Sold for scrap in 1995. From Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core, In the Royal Australian Navy, pennant numbers are normally rendered with a space between the letters and numbers, and use an expanded identifier similar to the United States Navy's, Company formed following the 1967 merger of Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Company and, File:HMS Ocelot (S17) underway in 1989.JPEG, Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Site historique maritime de la Pointe-au-Père, https://infogalactic.com/w/index.php?title=List_of_Oberon-class_submarines&oldid=666827242, Wikipedia articles needing page number citations from June 2015, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, About Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core, Operated by Canada from 1989 to the 1990s as a non-commissioned, Between 1988 and 1991, used by Canada as a, Sold for scrap in 1995. They were designed as a direct follow-on from the Porpoise-class: physical dimensions were the same, but stronger materials were used in hull construction, and updated equipment was fitted. [1], The submarines were built between 1957 and 1978 by four shipyards: Cammel Laird (4), Chatham Dockyard (6), Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Company (11) and Vickers-Armstrongs (6). They were attack submarines, with both anti-surface and anti-submarine capabilities. Glass-reinforced plasticwas used i…

[2] Thirteen of the submarines were operated by the Royal Navy, six by the Royal Australian Navy, three by the Brazilian Navy, three by the Royal Canadian Navy/Canadian Forces Maritime Command (plus two ex-Royal Navy boats later acquired for non-commissioned roles), and two by the Chilean Navy.[2]. The rest have been sold for scrap, including one former museum vessel. Submarines of the class were in service until 2000. They were designed as a direct follow-on from the Porpoise-class: physical dimensions were the same, but stronger materials were used in hull construction, and updated equipment was fitted. As of 2015, eight of the submarines are preserved intact as museum vessels, another three are partially preserved (with some exterior portions of the submarine on display), and one is in private ownership and awaiting conversion for display. Fin and upper casing preserved at, Preserved at the Navy Cultural Centre, Rio de Janeiro, Originally laid down for the Royal Navy as. The rest have been sold for scrap, including one former museum vessel. Oberon-class submarine HMS Ocelot underway in 1989, The Oberon class was a ship class of 27 British-designed submarines operated by five different nations. [2] Thirteen of the submarines were operated by the Royal Navy, six by the Royal Australian Navy, three by the Brazilian Navy, three by the Royal Canadian Navy/Canadian Forces Maritime Command (plus two ex-Royal Navy boats later acquired for non-commissioned roles), and two by the Chilean Navy.[2]. The “Oberon” class was one of the most advanced type of conventional submarines in any navy, combining high speed with great underwater endurance. Fin and upper casing preserved at, Preserved at the Navy Cultural Centre, Rio de Janeiro, Originally laid down for the Royal Navy as. Oberon-class submarine HMS Ocelot underway in 1989 The Oberon class was a ship class of 27 British-designed submarines operated by five different nations.

[2] Thirteen of the submarines were operated by the Royal Navy, six by the Royal Australian Navy, three by the Brazilian Navy, three by the Royal Canadian Navy/Canadian Forces Maritime Command (plus two ex-Royal Navy boats later acquired for non-commissioned roles), and two by the Chilean Navy.[2]. The Oberon class was a ship class of 27 British-designed submarines operated by five different nations. Designed specifically for silent running, they were amongst the quietest operational submarines in the world, including nuclear submarines. Instead of UXW steel, the hull was built from QT28 steel, which was easier to fabricate and stronger, allowing the submarine to dive deeper. ► Oberon Class Submarines Memorial, Rockingham Naval Memorial Park ‎ (6 F) ► Oberon class submarines of Chile ‎ (2 C) ► HMS Ocelot (S17) ‎ (49 F) ► HMCS Ojibwa (S72) ‎ (5 F) The Oberons operated during the height of the Cold War, with duties including surveillance, tracking of other ships and submarines, delivery and retrieval of special forces personnel, and serving as targets for anti-submarine training.